The Seven Key Values of the St. Vincent de Paul Society

St. Vincent de Paul Society pic

St. Vincent de Paul Society
Image: svdpusa.org

A native of Brownsville, Texas, Micheal “Mike” Albert Hernandez III works as the chief executive officer of D&M Leasing in Dallas. Away from work, Mike Hernandez III supports several charitable initiatives, including the St. Vincent de Paul Society (SVP), a faith-based organization that provides help and hope to those in need.

SVP operates on seven key values:

1. Christ as the center. The recognition and acceptance that Jesus Christ is present everywhere.

2. Respect. In acknowledging that all people are created equal, SVP maintains the dignity of those it supports.

3. Compassion. A nonjudgmental approach to its work ensures SVP volunteers demonstrate compassion at all times.

4. Responsiveness. SVP remains alerted to the ever-evolving needs of the communities it supports, enabling it to respond accordingly.

5. Generosity. Volunteers must give of their possessions, resources, and time in service of the less fortunate.

6. Confidentiality. SVP respects the privacy of those it serves while understanding that the well-being of vulnerable people is the main priority.

7. Accountability. SVP volunteers understand their own skills and knowledge, which helps ensure accountability for their actions.

The St. Vincent de Paul Society’s Visiting and Befriending Program

 

St. Vincent de Paul Society pic

St. Vincent de Paul Society
Image: svp.org.uk

A veteran business leader who has served Dallas-based D & M Leasing since 1984, Michael “Mike” Albert Hernandez III now focuses primarily on philanthropic activities in the Brownsville area. Among the organizations Mike Hernandez III supports is the St. Vincent de Paul Society, a collective of Christian volunteers committed to doing what they can to help those in need.

The society’s visiting and befriending program is a key part of its efforts. Volunteers provide their time and personal care to the ill and elderly, building trusting relationships with those who would otherwise struggle to confront issues such as loneliness and depression. Visits are often as simple as providing somebody with a friendly person to chat with, though volunteer support often extends to helping others conduct a range of activities, such as decorating, shopping, and filling out important forms.

A select group of society volunteers also become prison visitors, which may involve visiting prisoners directly or providing child-care services to family members who wish to visit someone in prison.